How Fashion Can Empower Women

How Fashion Can Empower Women

Too often, we write fashion off as a frivolous idea.

After all, what need do we really have for nice shirts or our favorite pair of jeans in the long run?

There is also the idea that fashion can be detrimental to women.

This argument says that it pressures women to look a certain way and make those who don’t feel worse about themselves.

These, at times, can be true but they overlook a key factor. Fashion can be used to empower women and make them feel fantastic. How can clothing and accessories do so much to empower women? That’s what we are going to look at today.

It Can Make You Feel Confident

The most obvious way that fashion can empower women – or anyone, really – is how the right outfit can make you feel.

You can put on an outfit and it can make you feel a certain way.

For instance, a blazer and slacks or well-tailored suit can make you feel very powerful or a sleek cocktail dress can make you feel sexy and confident.

Pinterest

Whatever outfit works for you, feeling confident is key.

You should feel confident as you move through life and presenting yourself the way that feels best to you can go a long way towards achieving that.

It Can Help You Show Your Personality

We’ve all heard about the importance of first impressions.

That means that the clothing you wear can help you to show off your personal aesthetic.

For instance, if you are into the punk scene, a leather jacket and a good pair of black boots can go a long way in helping you feel like you are showing yourself in your style.

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This, again, comes back to confidence.

If you feel like you are comfortable in what you are wearing and that it reflects your personality, you’re going to be more confident in yourself.

Express Your Creativity

You can also use fashion to express your creativity.

It’s true that a lot of the clothing we wear is mass produced but the way you wear it, what it’s worn with, and how and if you modify it that can show off just how creative you can be.

Even if mass produced clothing isn’t unique enough for you, you can make your own clothes or comb through thrift stores and the internet to find one-of-a-kind pieces that people just like you, with your style, have made.

It Can Be a Way Forward

If fashion is a passion for a young woman, it can be a way forward in their careers. This is because if you love fashion, you are probably interested in creating something unique for yourself as we noted when we talked about creativity.

For some people who love fashion, though, this will become a career and their designs will empower women for generations to come.

After all, Coco Chanel, Christian Dior, and Alexander McQueen were all once simply people who loved fashion. By the height of their careers, however, they became undeniably influential just as young women today could one day be.

Dior

Sustainable or eco-friendly fashion is one of the biggest movements in the fashion industry and many designers have embraced this trend. Fashion icons and designers have inspired entrepreneurs in the world to follow the idea of sustainable clothing.

You Can Express Your Views and Offer Support

In the past few years, we’ve seen people wearing t-shirts that have slogans such as “The Future Is Female”.

Fashion Nova

From the 2016 American election to historical points such as during the Vietnam War, fashion has been used to send a message. This is something that fashion has leaned toward, especially in the last several decades and can be empowering in the way that it carries the weight of someone’s views.

It is here, especially that we must remember that fashion is, in fact, an art form. The creation of designers, both professional and amateur, can carry heavy messages believed both by designers and those who wear their clothes.

This might not seem like much but it can be a lot. These designs can show other people that you support them or their cause and they can be the signal of a movement.

Fashion can be a point of solidarity and it can be a point of protest against what the designer and wearer thinks need to be changed.

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Annabelle Short

Annabelle Short is a writer and a seamstress of more than 5 years. She splits her time between London and Los Angeles and writes for Wunderlabel.

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